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Static Electricity Experiment - Static Balloons
 
Resisting Balloons
Materials you will need:
• Tape
• Scissors
• Door Frame
• Two Balloons
• String/Thread
• A Woollen Sweater/Jumper
 
Steps

1. Cut two equal lengths of thread/string and tape them to the top of a door frame in the middle about 1 inch or 2.5 cm apart.

2. Blow up the balloons and tie each end so that the air does not escape.

3. Tie each of the blown up balloons to the end of each thread/string so that they are hanging at the same height and are resting next to each other.

4. Rub each of the balloons with the woolly jumper/sweater to charge them (one at a time).

What happens when you let them go? How do they react to each other?

Both of the balloons have become negatively charged once they have been rubbed with the woollen jumper/sweater and will push each other away. Items that are made up of the same material will always take on the same charge.

If you have a matching charge of static electricity in like items, they will repel each other just like the same poles of magnets will repel each other.

Try to bring the two balloons together after they have been rubbed with the woollen sweater/jumper. What happens when you try to bring the balloons together?

Place your hands in between the two balloons, does something different happen?

 
 
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