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Kids Matter Experiment - Steaming Up

 
Steaming Up

Materials you will need:

• Your hot breath
• A mirror or window
 
Steps

1. Take a deep breath.

2. Get real close to the mirror or window with your mouth.

3. Open your mouth and exhale your hot breath onto the mirror or window.

What has happened to the mirror or window?

It has steamed up or you could call it condensation.

Why do things steam up?

If you breathe on a mirror or window, it will steam up.

Your breath contains water although you can't see it.

The water is a type of gas, called a vapor, which is mixed with the air.

When the water vapor from your breath hits the cold mirror or window, some of it turns into a liquid.

Thousands of tiny droplets of water form on the mirror or window, and this is called condensation or steam.

You may have seen steam or condensation in the kitchen, the bathroom or in a car on a cold day.

You can see this steam or condensation in mid-air when you watch a kettle or a pan of water boil.

Hot water vapors are given off by the water.

The vapor cools when it meets cooler air and then turns into tiny (dew) drops, which forms the steam or condensation.

To sum up why do things steam up?

If you breathe on a mirror, the mirror steams up. Your breath contains water – though you cannot see it. The water is a type of gas called a vapour, mixed with the air. When the water vapour from your breath hits the cold mirror, some of it turns into a liquid. Thousands of tiny droplets of water form on the mirror, and this is called condensation.

You may have seen condensation in the kitchen, the bathroom or in a car. 

Kitchen - steam escapes from a boiled kettle, a hot oven door being opened and lids when lifted off a hot pot of cooking food.

Bathroom - steam is formed when the hot water is being used for taking a shower or a hot bath.

Car - steam is formed inside a car on a cold day because it is warmer inside the car.

Can you think of other places where steam can be found?

 

 
 
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